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Thread: Tiger leg care sheet??

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    Default Tiger leg care sheet??

    in october my girlfriend got me a tanzanian tiger leg tree frog, not the monkey tiger leg tree frog, for my birthday, it seems to be healthy but it wont eat for me. it might have when i throw a couple of crickets in there every now and then. does anyone know how to care for these guys? i cant find care sheets anywhere! ive checked google, yahoo, bing etc... and nothing has come up. will i have to just do what i thinks right and hope for the best? anything will hellp.
    1 Black and White Argentine Tegu
    1 Black Throat Monitor
    1 Ball python
    1 Sulcata Tortoise
    1 Leopard Tortoise (pardalis pardalis)
    3 Indian Star Tortoise
    1 Mali Uromastyx
    1 Spotted Salamander
    1 veiled chameleon
    1 Enigma Leopard Gecko
    1 Sunfire Bearded Dragon
    1 Australian whites tree frog
    1 red ear x yellow belly
    1 Yellow belly
    1 Red ear slider
    1 southern banded watersnake
    3 Savannah monitors
    2 Annoying Younger Brothers

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    614

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    Hello Daboogymann... I am not exactly familar with this species, however, I can offer this advice. crickets should never be left in a tank to roam free. Crickets will feed on the animals that are in the tank. They can cause quite the wounds to animals and can become bigger problems if they become infected. Also, if the animals are getting bit, it will cause the animal stress and it might not eat. You should try tong feeding... hold the cricket close to the frogs mouth and see if he eats it.

    Also, maybe try nightcrawlers... If they are too big, just cut them in half and try to feed the frog with the tongs.

    Also, temperature is very important, if it is too cold, a frog may not eat. After you find out the appropriate temps for the species, you will need to make sure you use an accurate thermometer or temp gun to verify temps. I know that most frogs like it in the mid 80's F or so

    Also, are you sure its tanzanian?? If you haven't maybe search the web for a pic of tree frog that looks liek yours. Then look for a care sheet..

  3. #3
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    Dec 2009
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    charleston sc
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    I'm positive it's a Tanzanian. I've got him in a whites tree frog setup at the moment and I've tried hand feeding him because that's how I feed all of my frogs and he gets angry and hops off.
    1 Black and White Argentine Tegu
    1 Black Throat Monitor
    1 Ball python
    1 Sulcata Tortoise
    1 Leopard Tortoise (pardalis pardalis)
    3 Indian Star Tortoise
    1 Mali Uromastyx
    1 Spotted Salamander
    1 veiled chameleon
    1 Enigma Leopard Gecko
    1 Sunfire Bearded Dragon
    1 Australian whites tree frog
    1 red ear x yellow belly
    1 Yellow belly
    1 Red ear slider
    1 southern banded watersnake
    3 Savannah monitors
    2 Annoying Younger Brothers

  4. #4
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    Dec 2009
    Location
    Maryland
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    ....Was he an import or captive bred?
    1.0.0 Argentine B&W Tegu
    0.0.2 African Pyxie Frog
    1.0.0 Blood Python
    1.0.0 Albino Burmese Python
    1.0.0 Blue Tongue Skink
    1.0.0 Basilisk
    0.0.1 Cane Toad
    1.0.0 Albino Western Hognose


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  5. #5
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    Dec 2009
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    charleston sc
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    I have no idea... She got it from someone on craigslist and she got it from a pet store that is no longer around. He just came out of hiding half an hour ago and I got a glimpse of him eat a mealworm I left in his dish. I think he's nocturnal and only eating at night, that's why I don't see him eat.
    1 Black and White Argentine Tegu
    1 Black Throat Monitor
    1 Ball python
    1 Sulcata Tortoise
    1 Leopard Tortoise (pardalis pardalis)
    3 Indian Star Tortoise
    1 Mali Uromastyx
    1 Spotted Salamander
    1 veiled chameleon
    1 Enigma Leopard Gecko
    1 Sunfire Bearded Dragon
    1 Australian whites tree frog
    1 red ear x yellow belly
    1 Yellow belly
    1 Red ear slider
    1 southern banded watersnake
    3 Savannah monitors
    2 Annoying Younger Brothers

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    San Antonio,TX
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    I'm sorry that I can't help you out on this one. I don't know anything about frogs :( . Good luck with everything.
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    Finger Lakes, NY
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    i think i can help you out.
    (not a lot, but every bit counts)

    is this what it looks like?

    if so it's not a "tanzanian tiger leg tree frog" (even tho they are sold as such)
    they are a "Red Legged Walking Frog" (Kassina maculata)


    Because they are nocturnal and do require a significantly moist environment (80% relative humidity is recommended), they are not as common a pet as other species of frog. However, being rather hardy and robust, they do survive well under appropriate basic conditions. A source of UV light is not required, and ambient temperature of 72 to 77 F (22 to 25 C) is sufficient. Both a thermometer and hygrometer should be present. Moss or coconut fiber should be used as substrate for burrowing, with both wet and dry ground areas within the enclosure. A basin or bowl of clean, fresh water is necessary. Misting of fresh water should occur twice a day at the wet end of the tank. Plants (real or artificial) should be present for climbing. A diet of live crickets, mealworms, or flies is appropriate, and size of food should be limited to the width of the space between the frog's eyes.

    These nocturnal frogs are primarily ground-dwellers, and found on the coastal plains of Kenya south into the north eastern Republic of South Africa. Their feet are not webbed, although they love to sit in shallow pools. Their pupils are vertically aligned, like a cats', and the eyes are deep bronze to burnished gold in color.

    When the rains come to the savannas, these frogs will then congregate around the pools of water to breed. Their loud "quoick" sounds are repeated at long intervals during this rainy season. Eggs are laid in the waters of these temporary pools en-mass. They are usually adhered to vegetation that grows up from under the water.



    Setup
    Because the frogs are ground-lovers, give them a longer than taller tank. 29 gallon is good for two to four frogs. The substrate should include Scotts peatmoss and several hiding places (plastic "caves") as they naturally burrow in daytime. Very secretive and shy frogs, do not expect to see much of them without a red-light for evening viewing, as well as a quiet room with no distrations. This tends to bring them out. I place in a jungle sounds c.d. to help them adjust and feel like coming out once in a while so I can see them.

    Make sure this frog receives a large sized pool with slightly moving water in which to soak. Place an airstone or sponge-type filter in it. When not hunting down the insects you've given them that night, they will be found soaking in the pool. Change the water daily if no filtration, and once every 3 days with filtration. This will keep ammonia build-up in the water from occuring, as they will also poop and pee in the water.

    Give them real or silk plants in the tank, with a screen-top. Lighting should have two strip fluorescents of daytime light quality. (And that red-light for evening peeking by you)

    Remove any uneaten bugs and poops daily. When you do your monthly house-cleaning, have a tall, clean tupperware with lid handy. Find them quickly, as they really do run fast ! Before you know it, they'll be up the glass and out of the tank! Place them in the tupperware while cleaning, watching for fingers when shutting lid and making sure you've washed your hands thoroughly first. Since we've broached handling here, don't make it a habit to pick this species up much. It will overly stress them.

    Keep the hygrometer at moderate, or 60%, in winter and fall. In spring and summer, raise that to 70 to 75%. Temperatures should never go below 68 in evening. Daytime temps are between 78 and 84.

    Feed them fat white grubs, superworms, crickets, fly maggots and termites (if available).
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    0.1.0 Hypo Red Tail Boa
    1.0.0 Lazik Tiger BP
    1.0.0 Normal Paradox BP
    1.0.0 Cuban Tree Frog
    2.3.0 America Toads
    1.0.0 Masked Ferret
    1.1.0 Children
    Rats & Roaches (Dubia)

    RIP-
    0.0.1 RedxB/W Tegu (Stevie Wonder)
    1.0.0 Croc Gecko (Waylan Jones I)

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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    charleston sc
    Posts
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    thats him! hahaha a local pet store owner told me its a tanzanian tiger leg so thats what ive been looking up since. The setup i have him in now is almost exactly what he needs except theres no dirt for him to dig in, its all water (its an exo terra terrarium) i know it might be a little much to ask for but does anyone know a good link on how to make a water/land seperator for an exo terra? all the ones ive found arnt very good write ups and seem very confusing.
    1 Black and White Argentine Tegu
    1 Black Throat Monitor
    1 Ball python
    1 Sulcata Tortoise
    1 Leopard Tortoise (pardalis pardalis)
    3 Indian Star Tortoise
    1 Mali Uromastyx
    1 Spotted Salamander
    1 veiled chameleon
    1 Enigma Leopard Gecko
    1 Sunfire Bearded Dragon
    1 Australian whites tree frog
    1 red ear x yellow belly
    1 Yellow belly
    1 Red ear slider
    1 southern banded watersnake
    3 Savannah monitors
    2 Annoying Younger Brothers

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Finger Lakes, NY
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    get a pice of cork bark (a flat sheet is best) cut it to fit side to side (or front to back) then cut it to the height you want silicone it in place let dry for 24 hours & ur good to go

    (u can put it in straight up and down or an angle, but when you put the bedding on the "dry" side leave it about an inch below the top of the bark. this will help keep the bedding out of the water & the frog can climb over it)
    1.2.0 Argen Black & White
    1.1.0 Red Tegu
    0.0.1 Blue Tegu
    1.0.0 All American Tegu
    0.1.0 Hypo Red Tail Boa
    1.0.0 Lazik Tiger BP
    1.0.0 Normal Paradox BP
    1.0.0 Cuban Tree Frog
    2.3.0 America Toads
    1.0.0 Masked Ferret
    1.1.0 Children
    Rats & Roaches (Dubia)

    RIP-
    0.0.1 RedxB/W Tegu (Stevie Wonder)
    1.0.0 Croc Gecko (Waylan Jones I)

    & More to come

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    charleston sc
    Posts
    82

    Default

    Awesome! thanks! ive never heard of someone using cork bark thats a brilliant idea.
    1 Black and White Argentine Tegu
    1 Black Throat Monitor
    1 Ball python
    1 Sulcata Tortoise
    1 Leopard Tortoise (pardalis pardalis)
    3 Indian Star Tortoise
    1 Mali Uromastyx
    1 Spotted Salamander
    1 veiled chameleon
    1 Enigma Leopard Gecko
    1 Sunfire Bearded Dragon
    1 Australian whites tree frog
    1 red ear x yellow belly
    1 Yellow belly
    1 Red ear slider
    1 southern banded watersnake
    3 Savannah monitors
    2 Annoying Younger Brothers

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